Senate 2022: The Full List of Seats Up For Re-election

Do you want to see the Democrats gain a bigger majority in the Senate in 2022? If so, you’ll want to bookmark this post.

I’ll talk about protecting the House in a future post, but if we are able to hang onto our majority in the House, then expanding the Senate is a must. First of all, having a 50-50 split Senate gives WAY too much power to individual Senators (cough Joe Manchin, cough Kyrsten Sinema). If we could expand our majority by even 2 or 3 seats, we could pass so much more of President Biden’s agenda! We might even be able to nuke the filibuster!

But first, remember this: Until the blue wave midterms of 2018, the Democrats had a HORRIBLE habit of not showing up to vote in off-cycle years. Even though we have control of Congress right now, we have the barest of majorities and if we let our guard down even a little bit, the Republicans will get right back into control. If that happens, President Biden won’t be able to get anything done past his first two years. Let’s make sure that doesn’t happen.

This cycle, 14 Democratic seats and 20 Republican seats will be up for re-election in the Senate. As per usual, though, only a small number of them are considered to be competitive. I’ve listed the competitive seats first and then noted the other seats up for re-election at the end.

It’ll be a while yet before we know who the final candidates will be for each of these races, but as these races take shape, I’ll continue to update you. So if you aren’t already a Political Charge subscriber, today would be a good day to sign up!

Competitive GOP Seats

Florida – Marco Rubio

North Carolina – Richard Burr (retiring)

Ohio – Rob Portman (retiring)

Pennsylvania — Pat Toomey (retiring)

Wisconsin – Ron Johnson

–> Donate now to the eventual Democratic nominee for each of these races through this ActBlue link. You can donate to one, or some, or all of these competitive seats by customizing the amounts.

Competitive Democratic Seats

Arizona – Mark Kelly (Campaign website; Donate here)

Georgia – Raphael Warnock (Campaign website; Donate here)

Nevada – Catherine Cortez-Masto (Campaign website; Donate here)

New Hampshire — Maggie Hassan (Campaign website; Donate here)

“Safe” Red Seats

Alabama – Richard Shelby (retiring)

Alaska – Lisa Murkowski

Arkansas – John Boozman

Idaho – Mike Crapo

Indiana – Todd Young

Iowa – Chuck Grassley

Kansas – Jerry Moran

Kentucky – Rand Paul

Louisiana – John Kennedy

Missouri – Roy Blunt (retiring)

North Dakota – John Hoeven

Oklahoma – James Lankford

South Carolina – Tim Scott

South Dakota – John Thune

“Safe” Blue Seats

California – Alex Padilla

Colorado – Michael Bennet

Connecticut – Richard Blumenthal

Hawaii – Brian Schatz

Illinois – Tammy Duckworth

Maryland – Chris Van Hollen

New York – Chuck Schumer

Oregon – Ron Wyden

Vermont – Patrick Leahy (retiring)

Washington – Patty Murray

Final Note

As we all know, the level of competitiveness of various races can change as we get closer to the midterms. If any of the “safe” seats becomes more competitive, I’ll move them into the appropriate heading.

As for donating, my personal approach is to focus my funds on the most competitive races, so I’ve included those ActBlue links for you. But, if you are interested in supporting the re-elections of any of the Democrats, or want to support a Democratic candidate running against a Republican in a “safe” seat, all power to you. If you have trouble finding their donation link, let me know and I’ll find it for you.

And finally, I’d be grateful if you would share this post on your social media accounts to spread the word!


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4 replies

  1. Leahy just announced his retirement, but isn’t Vermont going to remain BLUE?

  2. Who are we to support for the competitive red seats? I get emails from many candidates but do not know who at this point has the best chance. Will we have to wait until the state conventions to decide? Or do we evaluate the various candidates and pick the one who most supports what we believe matters and hope that she/he is the eventual candidate?

    • So, here’s what I do. If it is a district or state I don’t live in, I wait until the local voters decide who they want to represent them. Who am I to choose for them? Whoever has the best ad on Twitter? That doesn’t feel right to me. So often, I will wait until after the primary and then jump in with support.

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