Governor Seats Democrats Need to Combat Gerrymandering

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Image from Quanta Magazine

The governors who will get elected in 2018 will be in place when the once-a-decade process of redrawing congressional and legislative district lines takes place. Considering there are 36 governorships up for election this November, there’s a lot of progress Democrats can make to combat gerrymandering if we can win these important seats.

That said, if getting more competitive and fair districts is a passion of yours, then there are key states whose governorships you should focus your attention on. Multiple organizations who look at the redistricting issue have identified these 5 states as being the most important (this year) and where having a Democratic governor can turn the tide:

Ohio
Pennsylvania
Michigan

Wisconsin
Florida

Ohio and Pennsylvania have their primaries in May; Wisconsin, Michigan, and Florida have theirs in August. Donate to the governors’ campaigns, boost them on social media to get the word out about their platforms and to get voters excited to vote for them, and help get out the vote.

To get up to speed on what gerrymandering is and why Democrats need to combat it, read this primer.

For a look on the more comprehensive plan the National Democratic Redistricting Committee has to combat gerrymandering through elections in 2018, check out this article.

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Categories: Explainers

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